How to Ride a Motorcycle

How to Ride a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding Equipment

Motorcycle Riding Equipment

How to Choose a Motorcycle Style

How to Choose a Motorcycle Style

How to Perform a Routine Check of a Motorcycle

How to Perform a Routine Check of a Motorcycle

How to Get on a Motorcycle

How to Get on a Motorcycle

How to Start and Shift a Motorcycle

How to Start and Shift a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding - The Friction Zone

Motorcycle Riding - The Friction Zone

How to Powerwalk a Motorcycle

How to Powerwalk a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding

Motorcycle Riding

Starting and Stopping the Motorcycle

Starting and Stopping the Motorcycle

How to Brake on a Motorcycle

How to Brake on a Motorcycle

How to Brake on a Motorcycle

How to Brake on a Motorcycle

Starting and Stopping the Motorcycle

Starting and Stopping the Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding

Motorcycle Riding

How to Powerwalk a Motorcycle

How to Powerwalk a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding - The Friction Zone

Motorcycle Riding - The Friction Zone

How to Start and Shift a Motorcycle

How to Start and Shift a Motorcycle

How to Get on a Motorcycle

How to Get on a Motorcycle

How to Perform a Routine Check of a Motorcycle

How to Perform a Routine Check of a Motorcycle

How to Choose a Motorcycle Style

How to Choose a Motorcycle Style

Motorcycle Riding Equipment

Motorcycle Riding Equipment

How to Ride a Motorcycle

How to Ride a Motorcycle

Motorcycling the Keys

Motorcycling the Keys

How to Ride a Motorcycle

How to Ride a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding Equipment

Motorcycle Riding Equipment

How to Choose a Motorcycle Style

How to Choose a Motorcycle Style

How to Perform a Routine Check of a Motorcycle

How to Perform a Routine Check of a Motorcycle

How to Get on a Motorcycle

How to Get on a Motorcycle

How to Start and Shift a Motorcycle

How to Start and Shift a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding - The Friction Zone

Motorcycle Riding - The Friction Zone

How to Powerwalk a Motorcycle

How to Powerwalk a Motorcycle

Motorcycle Riding

Motorcycle Riding

Starting and Stopping the Motorcycle

Starting and Stopping the Motorcycle

How to Brake on a Motorcycle

How to Brake on a Motorcycle

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Jeff Thompson

Vice President of Course Curriculum, Motorcycle Riding Concepts

www.saddleupva.com  

703-491-9102

Motorcycle Riding Concepts provides cutting-edge motorcycle training. Our goal is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to meet the many challenges that operating a motorcycle on the streets of any metropolitan area presents. Our students are instructed by career police motorcycle officers, who ride motorcycles every day for a living.  Our certified instructors have  taught motorcycling skills to students from across the country and abroad. We will provide training motorcycles similar to the customers' personal choices, enabling them to experience and demonstrate learned skills without fear of damaging their own pride and joy. Upon completion of the training, our students will leave with the tools they need to enhance their skills, making them a safer rider and increasing their enjoyment of their motorcycling experience.</font>

Jeffrey Thompson is the Vice President of Course Curriculum for Motorcycle Riding Concepts. Jeff is a Police Sergeant and is currently assigned as a Crash Reconstruction Supervisor for a large suburban police agency. Jeff has owned, built, and operated motorcycles both on- and off-road for 40 years, of which 27 years have been with the police department. Jeff has been a certified Motorcycle Instructor for 20 years and has had the opportunity to instruct students from all over the USA and abroad.

How to Get on a Motorcycle

Motorcyclist Jeff Thompson demonstrates how to get on a motorcycle.

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Transcripts

Jeff Thompson: Hello! I am Jeff Thompson at Motorcycle Riding Concepts, we are going to teach you how to ride a motorcycle today. This is Mark Payton our CFO and he is going to be doing the demonstration of getting on and off the motorcycle and I would be doing the speaking. He is going to show you the proper way to mount on motorcycle as I speak to you.

So he is going to approach the motorcycle from the right side, we believe in approaching the motorcycle from the right side because of several different reasons. One of the main reasons is, it's because of the front brake is right here. As he approaches the motor cycle he is going to cage and cover the front brake, that adds stability to the motorcycle. He is going to bring his right hip up and put it in the center of the motorcycle right here at this V portion, right here at the base of the tank is where you should be approaching the motorcycle.

He is going to lean forward, grabbing the other handlebar with his left hand, taking control of the front of the motorcycle; he is going to swing his left leg up and over; as he does that he will right tilt the motorcycle and bring the kick stand up. You should bring your kick stand up as soon as you can, as soon as you get on the motorcycle therefore you don't forget it. But notice you still got the handlebars or excuse me the front brake caged and covered. He is got a nice comfortable riding position, leaning forward just a little bit with his back straight. Notice the crook in his arms, that gives him the ability when he is riding the motorcycle to turn the handlebars from left to right without moving his body.

How many riders, I have seen many riders out on the street, who like to sit back on the seat with their arms straight for a perceived comfort as they are riding down the road. But look what happens when they try to turn the motorcycle, they actually have to lean forward as they are turning. That's improper form, posture is very important when you ride a motorcycle. So he has got a nice comfortable riding position, now he has arrived where he wants to be and he is going to set the kick stand.

It's important for you to know where the kick stand is on your motorcycle, like I did in the last segment, know where the controls on your motorcycle are, sit in your garage one day when you cant ride or you selected not to ride for whatever reason and learn where all of your controls are. Turn the lights off, shut your eyes and by memory you should know where all of those controls are in your motorcycle. Okay having said that he set the kick stand and now the motorcycle is over on it's left side.

At this point he is going to switch hands and bring his left hand up and cover and cage the brake and push off the tank with his right hand and that is the proper way to get on and off the motorcycle. We feel that it's better to get on and off the on the right side for many different reasons, but the main reason is we can take control of that motorcycle with the brake there. Also if the highest point of the motorcycle your leg is actually going down on the seat when you go to get on, it's much easier for you to get on that way. Coming up next, we will show you how to start the motorcycle.

I also disagree. by MaryCarolyn at 12/02/11 08:29PM Flag

I have been riding for years and taken a few training courses along the way. I have never heard of mounting on the right side of the bike. After watching the video I went out to the garage and practiced this method a few times. How can this be safer than getting on from the left side? Truthfully, I thought this must have been a joke at first. I am not as tall as the man demonstrating on the video and my bike is not as short so maybe that has something to do with how uncomfortable it fel

i disagree by tak13954 at 06/24/11 02:53AM Flag

having ridden for more than 10 years, and taken the courses from the msf... its much safer to swing your right leg over the side than your left. You can still grip the front brake with your right hand from the left side, but your much less likely to knock the bike over (since its already leaning to the left from the kickstand) and less likely to burn yourself on the exaust... and since the msf basicaly makes sets the standards for riding, maybe they know what their talking about?

getting on a bike with a top box by oze at 02/21/09 12:57AM Flag

I liked the way you got on from the right hand side and not the side of the stand. My issue is getting on an BMW R1200RT that has a topbox. Bring a bit older throwing that leg over is a problem. The trick is to lean the bike but being a heavy bike I worry about dropping it which is not a good look. Any suggestions?

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