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Marty Cain

www.martycain.com  

828-669-9900

After receiving her BA from the University of New Hampshire and her MA and MFA degrees from the University of Iowa, Marty went on to become an active member of the Boston arts community for twenty one years, exhibiting her work in numerous galleries, creating environmental sculptures in state parks and other public spaces, founding member of the Boston Sculptors at Chapel Gallery, and creating the Reclamation Arts Group. She served on boards of cultural organizations including; The Boston Visual Artists Union, The Massachusetts Cultural Alliance, The Cambridge Arts Council, and One Percent Commission, The Institute of Contemporary Art and The New Art Center of Newton. She has taught in leading art institutions including the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University. As an art teacher, she shows students how to be in touch with that part of them selves which generates creative ideas.

 

As a child Marty learned dowsing from her Lithuanian grandfather, Frank Witkus. In 1986 she attended the American Society of Dowser's school and convention in Danville, Vermont and added formalized dowsing training to her life.

She researches ancient sacred sites in Europe and America discovering what makes specific places sacred and recreates that experience for others today. Integrating art and geomancy, she amplifies the potential of site-specific art and invokes wide public participation in Earth healing attitudes.

 

Currently Marty Cain is a visual arts instructor in the MFA program of Vermont College, a division of Union Institute. She is a life member of the American Society of Dowsers, where she co-directed the Beginning Dowsing School for the past six years. Marty presents labyrinth and dowsing workshops, consults, writes, and collaborates with the earth energy and angelic realms to co-create contemporary sacred spaces for individuals and institutions. She has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Blanche E. Colman Foundation, the Edna St. Vincent Millay Colony and Boreal/Art/Nature of Quebec, Canada.

 

Her art works are celebrations of nature, taking the form of site-specific environmental sculptures, smaller indoor constructions using natural elements, and photo/drawing collages of her installations and ancient sacred sites. Her labyrinth designs are located across North America (from Maine to California and Canada to Hawaii), Brazil and South Africa. She is a founding member of the Labyrinth Society.

Dowsing Tools - Y-Rods

Dowsing Expert Marty Cain discusses the dowsing tools, Y-rods.

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Marty Cain: Hi! I am Marty Cain from the American Society of Dowsers and we'll be demonstrating today how to use some basic dowsing tools and how to make them. And this section of our demonstration will be how to make the Y-rod, which is an ancient tool used throughout time. My grandfather always suggested that I use a apple. So, here's an apple twig and the problem with using apple or any other willow or an other tree branch is that you have to cut the branches. So I don't usually use a branch unless I'm out of in woods and I don't have any other tool with me. But apple was good and this is a Crabapple from my yard and what I've done is I've looked to find a branch that has pretty much equal with Y in it and then a short base for the pointer. So what I will do is cut that and then I'll clip off and trim it down, so you'll start to see that we have just that. And then I want the length of the Y itself about equal. So I'll cut off those and trim them down so that we have something to hold on to. That's it. Of course, if I was just fooling around, I wouldn't have to trim it at all. You can use it with all the little twigs on it, but they kind of get in the way especially for demonstrating. So here we have, my apple branch, it's in the shape of a Y-rod. Now I want to make sure the section where my hand is going to be, is a little smoother. Just to make sure that I don't hurt myself on these barbs. Because this is where I'll be holding on to it. So I want it as smooth as I can make it. So there -- so this is how we hold a Y-rod. So any branch that's flexible, now you can't use a Pine branch because when you put pressure on it, which is what you need to do to get the tension, it will break. So you need to have some branch that is able to hold the tension that you push on it and willow and apple are two very good ones, Walnut's probably good, just we are going to try almost anything, but if it's too brittle, it will just crack instead of giving the tension you need. So this is the shape of the Y-rod, obviously, it's a Y. You hold it by placing your hands underneath the Y, your thumbs over the top and then squeeze it and then you push in ever so slightly, so you've got a tension and it's often good to hold it a little bit away from your face because if it pops up, you're going to get it in the nose and if it pops down, you're safe. So you hold it and it's a slightly above, so it's like this way slightly pointing up and then I ask like with all my tools, please show me my yes response. And my yes response is down. Please show me my no response and then my no response is up. So that's what you have, a yes and a no, no and yes from the Y-Rod. Now I've noticed in the years of teaching that a lot of people have trouble with the Y-rod. I am not sure why, I think, that the Y-rod is dowsed through the gut area, that the information goes into your shocker system in the dowsing and I think, this is basically used more from the lower section of your body and some people actually work more from the heart, which is I believe what the L-rods work from and the Third Eye is I think, where the pendulum works from. So, if you have trouble getting a response with a Y-rod and it doesn't feel to be your tool, then it doesn't matter, because you still have the L-rods and the pendulum and the Bobber to work, with but give it a go. There are some people who absolutely love the Y-rod. Now, this is the one that's made out of just a wire from a street sweeper. So again, it has tension and it moves up and down and with something like this, or this is another piece of plastic, this is just held together with a metal clip, and my yes response please, it goes down, my no response, it goes up. So whatever works for you, and often in the field, it may always point down for that's what you're looking for, so we'll check out the field responses, in one of the later demonstrations. So this keeps me from having to cut down trees and destroy my apple orchid. So, there you have it, the Y-rod. I use a Y-rod in the field a lot, it's a very good tool for looking for water or for looking for lost items in a field or on the beach or whatever, and we'll go over that. So, there you have how to make your Y-rod. In the next segment, we'll be taking about the Bobber. And we'll be going right to that section next.