How to Play the Recorder

How to Play the Recorder

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

How to Play the Recorder

How to Play the Recorder

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Beatbox Tutorial

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

How to Play the Recorder

How to Play the Recorder

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

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Vicki Boeckman is an active and passionate performer of all styles of music and plays all sizes of recorders. Her travels and performances have taken her across the United States as well as Denmark, Norway, Sweden, England, Scotland and Germany. Her various recordings can be heard on the Kontra Punkt, Classico, Da Capo, Horizon, Musical Heritage America, Paula, Kadanza, and Primavera labels. 

 In great demand as a teacher of the recorder and related performance practices, Vicki coaches and teaches at workshops and seminars all over the United States and in British Columbia. She was chosen to be the recorder in-resident at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology in 2005 and 2010.  She is current Artistic Director for the Port Townsend Early Music Workshop and is the Music Director for the Portland Recorder Society.  Vicki has been on the faculty of the Music Center of the Northwest in Seattle since 2005, and with colleague, Darlene Franz, is the resident recorder teacher for the 3rd grade recorder program at West Woodland Elementary.  She is also on the faculty for the newly launched early music program at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle.

Since settling in Seattle in 2004, Vicki has been a featured soloist with the Seattle Baroque Orchestra, the Portland Baroque Orchestra, Portland Opera, Philharmonia Northwest Orchestra and the Skagit Symphony. She is a returning guest with the Medieval Women’s Choir led by Margriet Tindemans and the Gallery Concerts Series. Her Seattle-based chamber trio, Ensemble Electra, with violinist Tekla Cunningham and harpsichordist Jillon Stoppels Dupree, specialize in music of the 17th and 18th centuries as well as newly-composed works. Her duo with recorder maker David Ohannesian is a popular addition to the Early Music Guild’s School Programs, and is often asked to return to the same schools year after year.

Vicki resided in Denmark from 1981-2004.  She taught at the Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen for 12 years, and at the Ishøj Municipal School of Music for 23 years. She co-founded a regional recorder orchestra for children and teenagers which continues to flourish and grow. She was also co-founder of two Danish-based ensembles, Opus 4, and Wood’N’Flutes, with whom she continues to perform as often as possible in spite of the geography.

For more on Vicki, visit her website www.vickiboeckman.com

 

 

 

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Professional recorder player and teacher Vicki Boeckman has suggestions for starting on a plastic recorder and for avoiding condensation in the windway.

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Transcripts

Vicki Boeckman: Hi! I am Vicki Boeckman with the American Recorder Society, and I am talking about how to play the recorder. Today, I will help you choose an instrument.

I would recommend starting on a plastic instrument. The high-end plastic recorders are actually much better than the inexpensive wooden ones. The high-end plastic ones are modeled after museum instruments.

The only drawback to the plastic, and in fact, the wooden ones have the same, is that because the wind way is so small and we are blowing our warm air into them, they will clog up with some condensation, regardless of if its wood or plastic. It tends to happen a little more on the plastic, simply because the material is cold and doesn't expand.

What we can do to combat this is warm it up about 5 minutes before you play or 2 or 3 at least. Hold it in your hand like this so that it gets to be at the same body temperature as the air that you are blowing into it. If you do notice that the recorder starts clogging while you are playing it, gently suck up the moisture and then start it again.

The plastic instrument that I prefer is modeled after museum instrument and it is the Zen-on Stanesby Jr. model. You can see it kind of looks like wood, but it has a really sweet warm sound and you won't find that it sounds like plastic at all. It's very nice.

These high-end plastic recorders can be ordered through your local music store or through some well-respected sites online. These tips will help you choose your next recorder.