How to Play Songs on the Recorder

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

How to Play the Recorder

How to Play the Recorder

Beatbox Tutorial

Beatbox Tutorial

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - Reading Music

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - D Major Scale and Triad

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Tue Tue

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

Recorder Songs - Learn Joe Magarac

How to Play the Recorder

How to Play the Recorder

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - Choosing an Instrument

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - The Foundation - Breathing, Support, and Posture

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Tone Production

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

Playing the Recorder - Articulation

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How to Play the Harmonica

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Vicki Boeckman is an active and passionate performer of all styles of music and plays all sizes of recorders. Her travels and performances have taken her across the United States as well as Denmark, Norway, Sweden, England, Scotland and Germany. Her various recordings can be heard on the Kontra Punkt, Classico, Da Capo, Horizon, Musical Heritage America, Paula, Kadanza, and Primavera labels. 

 In great demand as a teacher of the recorder and related performance practices, Vicki coaches and teaches at workshops and seminars all over the United States and in British Columbia. She was chosen to be the recorder in-resident at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology in 2005 and 2010.  She is current Artistic Director for the Port Townsend Early Music Workshop and is the Music Director for the Portland Recorder Society.  Vicki has been on the faculty of the Music Center of the Northwest in Seattle since 2005, and with colleague, Darlene Franz, is the resident recorder teacher for the 3rd grade recorder program at West Woodland Elementary.  She is also on the faculty for the newly launched early music program at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle.

Since settling in Seattle in 2004, Vicki has been a featured soloist with the Seattle Baroque Orchestra, the Portland Baroque Orchestra, Portland Opera, Philharmonia Northwest Orchestra and the Skagit Symphony. She is a returning guest with the Medieval Women’s Choir led by Margriet Tindemans and the Gallery Concerts Series. Her Seattle-based chamber trio, Ensemble Electra, with violinist Tekla Cunningham and harpsichordist Jillon Stoppels Dupree, specialize in music of the 17th and 18th centuries as well as newly-composed works. Her duo with recorder maker David Ohannesian is a popular addition to the Early Music Guild’s School Programs, and is often asked to return to the same schools year after year.

Vicki resided in Denmark from 1981-2004.  She taught at the Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen for 12 years, and at the Ishøj Municipal School of Music for 23 years. She co-founded a regional recorder orchestra for children and teenagers which continues to flourish and grow. She was also co-founder of two Danish-based ensembles, Opus 4, and Wood’N’Flutes, with whom she continues to perform as often as possible in spite of the geography.

For more on Vicki, visit her website www.vickiboeckman.com

 

 

 

How to Play Songs on the Recorder

In this video, professional recorder player and teacher Vicki Boeckman helps you learn how to play five simple American songs on the recorder. The video is designed for beginning recorder players, both adults and children. It is recommended that the video How to Play the Recorder is watched so that the learner understands the basics of playing the instrument. This video includes an overview of basic note values and articulation. The pentatonic scale and the D major scale and other notes are demonstrated. With this foundation, hundreds of songs can now be played!

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Transcripts

[Music]Vicki Boeckman: Hi! I am Vicki Boeckman with the American Recorder Society. In this series, I am going to help you learn how to play simple songs on the Recorder. I will show you some basic note values, and rhythms. You will learn a couple of different scales or parts of scales, plus I will show you how to articulate or tongue on the recorder.

One of the important things to remember when playing on the recorder is that we want to the air flow to be continuous at all times. We want to strive for a beautiful tone with lots of support, even when we use our tongues. So let me demonstrate the difference an even airflow, and a choppy airflow. So the song that I just played. [Music]That was with a smooth air flow and here is what a choppy airflow.

[Music]The other thing that's important to remember is to be as relaxed and natural as possible. So if you are sitting, you want to find a chair that's comfortable and that's the right height for you. If you are standing, you want to stand so that you have a good balance between both of your feet but you are not kind of leaning over to one side. Bring the recorder up to your mouth; you want to have a nice, relaxed embrasure and no tension in the body whatsoever. So you don't have to read music in order to learn simple songs, but you do need to listen have a sense of rhythm so that you can imitate or learn by rote or repetition. Let's start with just a very simple pentatonic scale. I am going to start on the note B and then we are going to go down to A, G, E and D and our first song, we will be using those five notes. So here is B. [Music]And then practice going back up. [Music]So this first song is in the Time Signature called 4/4, very basic 1, 2, 3, 4.

[Music]That was the first half and the second half is exactly the same. [Music]So that's your first simple song on the recorder.