How to Get Your Walls Smooth

How to Get Your Walls Smooth

Tools and Gear for Wall Repairs

Tools and Gear for Wall Repairs

Fixing Small Holes and Nail Pops

Fixing Small Holes and Nail Pops

Fixing Medium Sized Holes in Walls

Fixing Medium Sized Holes in Walls

Fixing Wall Cracks

Fixing Wall Cracks

Fixing Large Holes in Walls

Fixing Large Holes in Walls

Prepping Your Walls for a Paint Job

Prepping Your Walls for a Paint Job

Readying Your Room For Painting

Readying Your Room For Painting

3 Problem Door Solutions

3 Problem Door Solutions

Toilet Tweaks That Save Money

Toilet Tweaks That Save Money

Basic Toilet Repair

Basic Toilet Repair

Fast Nail Pop Fixes

Fast Nail Pop Fixes

DIY Squeaky Floor Fix

DIY Squeaky Floor Fix

Simple Splatter Fixes

Simple Splatter Fixes

Tricks To Tape Trim

Tricks To Tape Trim

Caulking Gaps For Smooth Seams

Caulking Gaps For Smooth Seams

Keeping Home And Self Paint Free

Keeping Home And Self Paint Free

Neat Painting Prep

Neat Painting Prep

Taping Trim For Clean Lines

Taping Trim For Clean Lines

Prepping Woodwork For Paint

Prepping Woodwork For Paint

Picture Perfect Walls For Painting

Picture Perfect Walls For Painting

 Readying The Walls and Floors

Readying The Walls and Floors

Perfect Painting Prep

Perfect Painting Prep

Painting Over Existing Wall Coverings

Painting Over Existing Wall Coverings

Varnished Trim Painting Tricks

Varnished Trim Painting Tricks

 Textured Ceiling Painting Tips

Textured Ceiling Painting Tips

Painting Clean Corners On Textured Walls

Painting Clean Corners On Textured Walls

Tackling Tough Painting

Tackling Tough Painting

Priming Bare Wood For Easy Painting

Priming Bare Wood For Easy Painting

Simplify Color Change With Primer

Simplify Color Change With Primer

Priming Glossy or Non-Porous Surfaces

Priming Glossy or Non-Porous Surfaces

Priming Fresh Drywall and Wall Repairs

Priming Fresh Drywall and Wall Repairs

Using Primer To Undo Stains

Using Primer To Undo Stains

Paint Perfectly With Primer

Paint Perfectly With Primer

Painting an Exterior Steel Door

Painting an Exterior Steel Door

Painting a Raised Panel Interior Door

Painting a Raised Panel Interior Door

Painting a Flush Interior Door

Painting a Flush Interior Door

Prepping a Door to Paint

Prepping a Door to Paint

Top Door Painting Tricks

Top Door Painting Tricks

Painting Walls Using a Roller

Painting Walls Using a Roller

Painting Walls - Edging with a Brush

Painting Walls - Edging with a Brush

Painting Walls - Masking Tape

Painting Walls - Masking Tape

Painting Walls - Prep Tips

Painting Walls - Prep Tips

Painting Walls - Equipment

Painting Walls - Equipment

Painting Walls - Beyond the Basics

Painting Walls - Beyond the Basics

3 Quick Fixes for a Door That Won’t Stay Closed

3 Quick Fixes for a Door That Won’t Stay Closed

Cut a Door The Goof-Proof Way

Cut a Door The Goof-Proof Way

Remove a Heavy Door Without Breaking Your Back

Remove a Heavy Door Without Breaking Your Back

Fix a Sticky Door the Easy Way

Fix a Sticky Door the Easy Way

Five-Minute Door Fixes

Five-Minute Door Fixes

Fixing Stair Squeaks

Fixing Stair Squeaks

Fixing Squeaks Under Hardwood Floors

Fixing Squeaks Under Hardwood Floors

Fixing Floor Squeaks From the Underside

Fixing Floor Squeaks From the Underside

Fixing Squeaks Through Carpeting

Fixing Squeaks Through Carpeting

How to Fix Floor Squeaks

How to Fix Floor Squeaks

Toilet Repair - Replacing the Flush Lever and Flapper

Toilet Repair - Replacing the Flush Lever and Flapper

Toilet Repair - Replacing the Supply Line and Shutoff Valve

Toilet Repair - Replacing the Supply Line and Shutoff Valve

Toilet Repair

Toilet Repair

Fixing Large Holes in Walls

Fixing Large Holes in Walls

Fixing Wall Cracks

Fixing Wall Cracks

Fixing Medium Sized Holes in Walls

Fixing Medium Sized Holes in Walls

Fixing Small Holes and Nail Pops

Fixing Small Holes and Nail Pops

Tools and Gear for Wall Repairs

Tools and Gear for Wall Repairs

How to Get Your Walls Smooth

How to Get Your Walls Smooth

Roofing System Basics

Roofing System Basics

Attic Ventilation Tips

Attic Ventilation Tips

How To Choose Roof Shingles

How To Choose Roof Shingles

Common Roofing Problems

Common Roofing Problems

Choosing Roof Shingle Style & Color

Choosing Roof Shingle Style & Color

How To Choose A Roofing Contractor

How To Choose A Roofing Contractor

Power Tool Maintenance

Power Tool Maintenance

How To Clean Your Gutters

How To Clean Your Gutters

Choosing A Deck Stain

Choosing A Deck Stain

How To Prep A Deck For Resurfacing

How To Prep A Deck For Resurfacing

How To Resurface A Deck

How To Resurface A Deck

How To Stain A Deck

How To Stain A Deck

View more ...

The Family Handyman

The Family Handyman

www.familyhandyman.com  

800-285-4961

The Family Handyman is the DIYers best friend, offering a variety of print and digital resources for do-it-yourself homeowners. Our forte is accurate and complete how-to instructions for improving homes, yards and vehicles. We publish The Family Handyman magazine, the oldest and largest publication for DIYers, and a variety of newsstand publications in addition to this web site.  The Family Handyman is part of the Reader’s Digest Association family of brands, including Taste of Home, Allrecipes.com, Birds & Blooms, Everyday with Rachael Ray, and of course Reader’s Digest.

Fixing Small Holes and Nail Pops

Ken Collier, editor at the Family Handyman Magazine, demonstrates how to patch small nail holes, such as would be left by picture hanging nails, nail pops and small holes up to about the size of a golf ball.

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Ken Collier: Hello! My name is Ken Collier and I am an Editor at the Family Handyman Magazine, the leading brand for do-it-yourself homeowners. Before you can get a great paint job, you need to get your walls smooth. I am going to tell you about how to patch small nail holes, such as would be left by picture hanging nails, nail pops and small holes up to about the size of a golf ball.

Here we have two nail holes where somebody changed their body about where they wanted their picture to be and what are called nail pops, but are often screw pops as well, where the drywall fastener has become exposed. Fixing small nail holes is simplicity itself. Forget using toothpaste or soap or any of those home remedies. Buy a small tub of latex spackling compound and use a small flexible putty knife to apply it. Here you go.

While the spackling compound is drying, let's fix this nail pop or screw pop in this case. The main tool you need is a driver drill with a Phillips driver bit and a couple one-and-a-quarter inch drywall screws. We will put one in, above and one below the offending nail or screw.

The trick with driving in drywall screws is to put them in so they are below the surface of the drywall, but not so deep that they tear the paper that forms the surface of the dry wall. Now once we have got two drywall screws in, we will drive in the drywall screw or in the case of a nail, pound it in a little deeper and we are ready to apply some drywall compound.

Our two nail holes are now ready for their second coat of spackling compound. For the nail pops, you are going to want to use drywall joint compound, commonly referred to as mud. For the first coat, you goal is to fill the nail holes or the screw holes. We will come back once this is dry and apply a second coat and then a third coat.

While the mud is drying on our nail pops, let's return to our small picture hanging nail holes. Now if you are filling the holes with spackle, two coats maybe enough or you can try a third. When they are dry, it's time to sand. I am sanding with a very simple wooden block and some 120 or 100 grit sandpaper.

Alright, let's test this and see if the mud is dry. Oh yeah, it feels good. Okay, I will scrape off any ridges and then sand. I am paying particular attention to the edges feathering them out nicely so they have a nice undetectable edge. When you have sanded, there is still one critical step left and that's to prime the patches.

It's important to prime the patches so that when you paint over it, the paint has the same level of gloss everywhere. If you don't prime, the patches will tend to show through as just the difference in gloss and the overlying paint. I am using a quick drying primer that should allow me to go over this with paint very quickly.

When the primer is dry, your walls would be nice and smooth and ready for that perfect coat of paint.