How to Care for Your Rabbit

How to Care for Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Basic Health Considerations for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Basic Health Considerations for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Give Medications to your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Give Medications to your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Proper Housing for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Proper Housing for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Choosing the Proper Diet for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Choosing the Proper Diet for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Spaying or Neutering your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Spaying or Neutering your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Social Needs for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Social Needs for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Grooming Tips for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Grooming Tips for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Bunny Proof Your Home

Rabbit Care - How to Bunny Proof Your Home

Rabbit Care - How to Handle Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Handle Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Relax Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Relax Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Relax Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Relax Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Handle Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Handle Your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Bunny Proof Your Home

Rabbit Care - How to Bunny Proof Your Home

Rabbit Care - Grooming Tips for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Grooming Tips for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Social Needs for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Social Needs for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Spaying or Neutering your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Spaying or Neutering your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Choosing the Proper Diet for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Choosing the Proper Diet for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Proper Housing for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Proper Housing for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Give Medications to your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - How to Give Medications to your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Basic Health Considerations for your Rabbit

Rabbit Care - Basic Health Considerations for your Rabbit

How to Care for Your Rabbit

How to Care for Your Rabbit

All About Rabies

All About Rabies

Check On Pet Dental Health

Check On Pet Dental Health

Find Pet Food For Every Stage Of Life

Find Pet Food For Every Stage Of Life

Special Care Tips For Older Dogs

Special Care Tips For Older Dogs

How To Leave A Pet Home Alone

How To Leave A Pet Home Alone

The Best Pets For Children

The Best Pets For Children

Pet Passenger Safety

Pet Passenger Safety

All About Yorkshire Terriers

All About Yorkshire Terriers

All About Labrador Retrievers

All About Labrador Retrievers

All About German Shepherds

All About German Shepherds

All About Dachshunds

All About Dachshunds

Energy Efficiency Tips For Pet Owners

Energy Efficiency Tips For Pet Owners

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View more ...

Aileen Kara

VP of Programs for Friends of Rabbits, Friends of Rabbits

www.friendsofrabbits.org  

About me:

I first got introduced to rabbits as pets when a dear friend and fellow pet devotee Kris Ratliff helped me adopt my first rabbit, Mokona.  She herself was going through vet school, and was a vet assistant at a local pet hospital in MD.  Her experiences, and my own from there on out helped me perfect the basic forms of rabbit massage shown in a video here on Monkeysee. 

With a music therapy background, I knew that therapeutic goals are accomplished in many ways, some that might not always be viewed as successful as others.  I believed that rabbit massage as therapy, and a connection between a rabbit and it's owner would not only increase happiness, but work on health related goals at the same time.  This strive to achieve has been shown over the years with hands on demonstrations with my own rabbits, and with countless others.  I believe the stronger connection between the pet (be it dog, cat or rabbit), the better the quality of life, and the closer connection between pet and owner.

I started my work with Friends of Rabbits back in 2000 and have assisted in numerous spa days, educational events, fundraisers and overall activities. 

About the group:

Friends of Rabbits is an independent rabbit rescue and welfare group based in Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia. Our goal is to rescue homeless and abandoned domestic rabbits and to promote the adoption and welfare of domestic rabbits through education and example. Domestic rabbits have been created through human intervention, and are dependent on us for survival. It is therefore our responsibility to care for them.

Friends of Rabbits believes that all rabbits are valuable as individuals, regardless of physical attributes, personality or health.

Friends of Rabbits does not condone the exploitation of rabbits for profit or medical research.

Friends of Rabbits is not licensed to rehabilitate wildlife. All wildlife rescue cases will be referred to licensed rehabilitators.

Friends of Rabbits believes all domestic rabbits should live indoors with humans.

We believe all domestic rabbits should be neutered or spayed, except in case of other overriding medical concerns, and they should receive the same level of veterinary care as other companion animals.

Friends of Rabbits believes all rabbits deserve a quality life, including toys, exercise, mental stimulation and social interaction with humans and other animals. These are as essential to ensuring a healthy life as food, water and shelter.

Although our goal is to ensure all rabbits in our care are spayed or neutered, live indoors and receive appropriate medical attention, we also support sanctuaries that shelter abandoned, abused and unadoptable rabbits that may not always be able to meet these standards. Friends of Rabbits also recognizes other legitimate rabbit rescue groups, humane societies and animal shelters. Friends of Rabbits respects the privacy of its members and does not share its membership list with any other organizations.

 

Rabbit Care - How to Give Medications to your Rabbit

Rabbit care expert Aileen Kara Hudspeth discusses rabbit care and how to give medication to a rabbit.

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Transcripts

Aileen Kara Hudspeth: Hi, my name is Aileen Kara Hudspeth with Friends of Rabbits. I am here talking about how to care for your rabbit. Now we are going to discuss giving medications. Giving medications to rabbits can be difficult. However, it is doable as being at home and not being at the doctor's office. We are going to try and help you learn up techniques that you can use to make those pills getting down a little easier. Now currently we have been telling you that treats are not to be given regularly for an animal. However, if medications need to be given, treats seem to be the best way to look at it because if you know that your rabbit is going to want to bite into a banana which is his or her favorite treat, why not? Take a piece of that banana and then what you can do is, say you have been given a pill that you need to get down. You can hide this pill in the banana and then there is a possibility it's going to get down because you know your bunny really loves having this banana. But there are other also treats you can use to incorporate with pills. For instance, if you have a smaller pill you could be able to possibly pocket it into a raisin or a piece of dried fruit like an apple. At some points you are going to have to ask your doctor if the pill that you are about to use can be crushed if your rabbit is kicking the pill back out spitting it. Then you may need to look at making it more of a powdered consistency and again, taking powder and then we will use the powder into a piece of fruit and that's another way to try administer that pill that you are having problems getting down. You can easily use a rolling pin with some weight, very easily over that pill, just a little bit of weight, easily crush it, don't have to roll, you could also take that same pill and crush it using an apothecary. Now some of the ways you are going to have to give medications can be different. We are obviously here talking about oral. There are also medicines you are going to have to give that are not going to be oral. Oral medications could also be given through the syringe and if you are having problems with the medication you have been giving actually going down you really want your rabbit to lick the medication out of the syringe on their own. However, that's not always possible. You can use alternatives like baby food or a smoothie consistency fruits to be able to put in here and mix with the medication so that it gives them a consistency they like the taste of and it still gets the medication down which is truly what your goal is here. Now sometimes, you will find that you need to be able to feed your rabbit and they don't want to eat at all. That means no treats, they are not eating and you need to be able to not only get medication down, but you need to be able to get some substance in them. You need to make sure that they are getting their nutrients. There are things such as this Critical Care here that you would take, mix with water. The portions are listed and your veterinarian can provide you with an adequate amount you should use per day to supplement what they are not getting, that they should be getting because they have failed to continue eating proper diet. Now the rarity would be that your doctor would expect you to start giving medications under the skin or even have fluids like this one. If you have any questions on how to do this or if you are prepped with having to do this, make sure you ask your veterinarian to run you through it so that you can make sure that you are comfortable with doing that at home. Obviously, that would include any type of medications you would have to give under the skin. I am sure that they would be willing to show you how to make sure that you are doing that properly. So when you go home, you are a little bit more comfortable than perhaps the doctor was giving it to your pet when they were at the veterinary clinic. These are some of the hints that you can use especially if you have a rabbit that doesn't want to work real well with you. You can easily take a blanket or a towel like this one and wrap them up gently and hold their feet down so that you are not going to get scratched or kicked when you are trying to administer some of these medicines because not necessarily do they taste well that they may not go down real well and you need to make sure that you are protecting yourself and the rabbit from either one of you injuring themselves. These are just some things that you can think about when you have to give medication to your rabbit. Next we are going to talk about rabbit housing.